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🍄Wild Mushrooms 🍄Scarlet Elf Cup – Homesteading 🌽

Good morning, afternoon and evening from me in England!


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Photography by Darren Claxton


Whlist out on a woodland walk with my family today, I came across the most unusual mushroom.
At first, we thought it was some kind of toadstool or funghi, but in fact, it was an edible ‘Scarlet Elf Cup.’


Here’s some information courtesy of
https://www.wildfooduk.com/articles/wild-mushrooms-for-beginners/


Scarlet Elf Cups

Safety Rating 10 out of 10

These little beauties stand out a mile because of their colour, unless like me you are a little bit colour blind… The Scarlet Elf Cup is aptly named, it’s beautiful scarlet colour and it’s cup shape are 2 of its key defining features. The other 2 are that this mushroom does have a stem, which tapers down a bit like the stem on a wine glass. The stem and the back of the scarlet elf cup are also never the same colour as the cup itself. They are always a more orange to off white colour. You can both see and hear the spores being released from this mushroom by picking one, quickly blowing across the cap and holding it near to your ear.This mushroom also grows in mid winter when not many others do. From December up to March is when you are most likely to find them.There is one mushroom that you could mistake these for that is very similar. That is the Ruby Elf Cup. It has all the same features with a slightly deeper colouring, but that would not be a dangerous mistake to make as it is equally as edible.In the Kitchen


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Photography by Darren Claxton


Culinary Rating 8 out of 10

Slightly unexpectedly, these little cups have a lovely mushroomy flavour, and a reasonably firm texture. Lightly cooked they make a lovely colouful addition to any salad, but use them in any dish in a similar way to normal mushrooms, or cook them a bit more to use as a red mushroom garnish on top of a steak.



Thanks for reading my post and be sure to check out my music posts too!

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Toad in The Hole – Good Food on a Budget

Toad In The Hole – Frugal Living & Delicious Food on a Budget


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We’ve been living the #frugal #life for the past year now, after deciding that we were spending far too much of our hard earned cash on overly expensive food, from rip off supermarkets and local shops.


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Source


I love to cook, and am the head-chef in our house as well as doing the weekly ‘Friday Big Shop’ at Aldi. I work full time at a Special Educational Needs school during the week, and rarely get a chance to muster something yummy up of an evening, but I always cook for my little family on a Sunday.


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Our newest family members – Dorothy and Annie – They free range and produce the best eggs!


A firm favourite that I cook (as voted for by my better half and kids) is the good ole’ British favourite


‘Toad In The Hole’

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Now, to my non-British cousins here, this meal possibly sounds like a weird dish that ‘The Twits’ would make!


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Source


But rest assured, it’s a delicious and belly-filling experience that you need to try. Made with ‘Yorkshire pudding batter mix and the best free range quality sausages, this really is a wonderful Autumn into (dare I say it) Winter warmer.


You can also use vegetarian sausages if you’re a veggie too!
There’s even a Vegan recipe too, which will please my besty @d-vine and other vegans reading this, which you can find here on the VeganPunks Web page


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Here’s the ingredients and method of my recipe for you to try. There are loads of recipes online, but I’ve adapted my own and it works a treat every time! so trust me folks!


Cost breakdown – In GBP ££
All Ingredients are from the supermarket Aldi


Ingredients


8 Cumberland Sausages (72% pork) – £1.39
Plain Flour – 45p 2kg (bulk buy which lasts for weeks)
6 Large Free range Eggs – Free from Dorothy and Annie
Olive Oil – 1l – £2.29
Semi-Skimmed Milk 6 pint – £1.48 (best to buy a large jug for our family)
Salt and Pepper – £1.00 together


Preparation time -30 mins to 1 hour
Cooking time – 30 mins to 1 hour
Serves – 2 children & 2 Adults

Preheat your oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
The hotter the better, which will really help that batter rise!


You will need this equipment


A rectangular glass oven dish (I find that the batter doesn’t stick as much with these)
Weighing scales
Whisk
Measuring Jug with ml/fl oz
Preheated oven at 200c/400f (Moderatley hot)
Ingredients
4 eggs
140g/5oz – Plain flour
200ml/7fl oz – Semi- skimmed milk
1 pinch of – Salt and Ground black pepper
8 good quality – Pork sausages
3 tbsp – Olive oil
pinch of dried mixed herbs and onions
Method


Here’s how to make the batter


Sift the plain flour into a large mixing bowl, then add the salt and pepper for seasoning.
Make a well in the centre of the flour and crack in the eggs. Using a wooden spoon, gradually beat the eggs into the flour then slowly beat in the milk until the batter is the consistency of double cream.


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Stir in the mixed herbs, cover and leave to stand for 30 minutes.
Place the sauasages in the dish, drizzle with olive oil and pop into the preheated oven for 10 minutes.
I like to prick holes in them to let the fat out, this will help with the non-sticking process.
Pour the batter over the hot sausages in the oven dish and Immediately return to the oven and cook for 35-40 minutes or until well-risen and golden-brown.


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I like serve it with different veg each week so today I chose some delicious new potatoes and garden peas, with thick good ole’ Bisto Best gravy!
I also like some hot English mustard on the side for the sausages, and mint sauce on the peas.


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Straight from the oven!


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The aromas are mouth watering and incredibly inviting…I bet you wish you had smellavision!


I hope you enjoyed my cooking blog post, and that you’re now rushing off to the kitchen to cook up this classic ‘Great British’ favourite! Happy cooking and eating folks, and please post your pictures in the comments section if you managed to re-create this dish!
Kindest
DC


All Photography Copyright © 2019 Darren Claxton

Winter Squash Carbonara with Pancetta and Sage

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

  • 4 oz. pancetta (Italian bacon), chopped

  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage

  • 1 2-lb. kabocha or butternut squash, peeled, seeded, cut into ½” pieces (about 3 cups)

  • 1 small onion, chopped

  • 2 cloves garlic chopped

  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

  • 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth

  • 12 oz. fettucine or linguine

  • ¼ cup finely grated Pecorino, plus shaved for serving

Recipe Preparation

  • Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add pancetta, reduce heat to medium, and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 8–10 minutes. Add sage and toss to coat. Using a slotted spoon, transfer pancetta and sage to a small bowl; set aside.

  • Add squash, onion, and garlic to skillet; season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent, 8–10 minutes. Add broth. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until squash is soft and liquid is reduced by half, 15–20 minutes. Let cool slightly, then purée in a blender until smooth; season with salt and pepper. Reserve skillet.

  • Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente. Drain, reserving 1 cup pasta cooking liquid.

  • Combine pasta, squash purée, and ¼ cup pasta cooking liquid in reserved skillet and cook over medium heat, tossing and adding more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until sauce coats pasta, about 2 minutes. Mix in ¼ cup Pecorino; season with salt and pepper.

  • Serve pasta topped with reserved pancetta and sage, shaved Pecorino, and more pepper.

  • DO AHEAD: Squash purée can be made 3 days ahead. Let cool; cover and chill.

Recipe by Alison Roman

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Photos by Christina Holmes

Calories (kcal) 660 Fat (g) 23 Saturated Fat (g) 7 Cholesterol (mg) 30 Carbohydrates (g) 94 Dietary Fiber (g) 8 Total Sugars (g) 10 Protein (g) 21 Sodium (mg) 780

Related Video

Dice an Onion in No Time Flat

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/winter-squash-carbonara-with-pancetta-and-sage

Smashed Crispy Potatoes

Heat reserved bacon skillet over medium. If the pan isn’t fully coated with bacon fat, add a good drizzle of oil—you want to make sure that there’s enough fat in the pan at all times so that each potato gets a piece of the action. Arrange half of potatoes in a single layer in skillet. Season with salt and cook, undisturbed, until golden brown and crisp underneath, 6–7 minutes. Flip with a metal spatula, add 2 Tbsp. oil, and continue to cook on opposite side until golden brown and edges are crisp, 5–6 minutes more. Transfer to a platter. Heat remaining potatoes and 2 Tbsp. oil in skillet over medium. Season with salt and repeat browning and flipping process, adding more oil if the pan gets dry.

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/smashed-and-loaded-crispy-potatoes

Find Your Signature Holiday Cocktail With This Be Your Own Bartender Flowchart

A tray with five glasses holding five different holiday cocktails

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Get the Recipes

I still remember the first time John McCarthy made me a drink. I was meeting my then-boss, now-friend, and go-to cocktail resource, Carey Jones, at a lounge where her newish boyfriend was bartending. She’d been talking up their drinks for a couple of weeks at that point, so I was hovering somewhere between doubtful (everyone thinks their new boyfriend is amazing) and really excited (Carey definitely knows what she’s talking about!). I walked in expecting a well-curated menu of classic drinks alongside some more creative house concoctions, but what I found was literally no menu at all.

Instead, a chalkboard next to the bar listed a variety of ingredient and flavor prompts: words like citrusy, ginger, smoky, pineapple, herbal, bright, fruity, spicy, and bubbly. From behind the bar, John encouraged me to pick two or three terms from the list, and to specify whether I was more in the mood for a brown spirit or a clear one. A brief exchange and five minutes of patient skepticism later, I was sitting before the customized cocktail of my dreams. My only regret was that I didn’t have a recipe to take home with me.

A lot’s changed since that day. Carey and John are married, they’ve moved to the West Coast, and they regularly collaborate on projects, like their cocktail column for Food & Wine. But what’s most important to me, and what should be most important to you, is that I finally have that recipe—and you can, too. Carey and John’s new book, Be Your Own Bartender: A Surefire Guide to Finding (and Making) Your Perfect Cocktail, makes an ingredient- and mood-driven custom cocktail experience something any of us can reproduce in the comfort of our own homes.

In their book, Carey and John set out to empower their readers to feel confident mixing drinks. That meant writing about basic cocktail-making tools and techniques, as well as crafting 170 recipes. The only problem with all those options? “It means that there’s a drink for everyone—but it also means that trying to find that drink could be a chore. I personally don’t want to page through 170 recipes before deciding what to make, and I’m the ‘expert’!” Carey told me. “We also think that people don’t know, always, what they’re in the mood for. But! You almost always have an opinion on A versus B. I can tell you that, right at this moment, I’d prefer an herbal drink to a floral one. I’d prefer whiskey to tequila. I’d prefer something lighter to something hit-me-over-the-head boozy.”

[Flowchart: Maggie Lee]

Most cocktail books address this issue with a thorough table of contents, often organized by spirit, season, or perhaps occasion. But Be Your Own Bartender takes a novel approach by using interactive, easy-to-navigate flowcharts to guide readers to the right recipe. Inspired by the types of questions they’ve fielded both personally and professionally over the years, Carey and John have managed to make the process of selecting a drink fun instead of overwhelming.

We asked the duo to take Serious Eats on a custom cocktail ride for the holidays. The five resulting drinks run the gamut, from a light, citrusy cocktail of Lillet and sparkling wine spiked with rosemary honey, to a dark and spicy mix of ginger beer and bourbon that gets a hint of sweetness from hard cider. Just scroll along and click on the drink that speaks to you. No matter which branch of the chart you follow, one thing’s certain: You’ll be sipping your way through the holidays in confident, satisfied, being-your-own-bartender style.

Get the Recipes

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Coconut Milk–Braised Chicken

Place a rack in top third of oven; preheat to 400°. Stir coconut milk and curry paste in a 2-qt. baking dish to combine (or, use a medium skillet if that’s what you’ve got). Add lemongrass, ginger, and garlic. Season chicken with salt (hold back a bit since curry pastes often have a lot of salt). Place in baking dish and spoon some liquid over. Bake, occasionally spooning liquid over, until chicken is browned, tender, and cooked throughout (the joint should be reasonably easy to flex), 60–75 minutes.

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/coconut-milk-braised-chicken-legs

Pork Roast

Toss leeks, potatoes, oil, and remaining garlic heads and 5 thyme sprigs in a large roasting pan; season with kosher salt. Place pork on top of vegetables and brush all over with some garlic butter. Roast, basting with garlic butter every 30 minutes or so and stirring vegetables, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into center of pork registers 120°, 75–105 minutes. Transfer pork to a cutting board. Tent pork with foil. Let rest at least 45 minutes or up to 3 hours.

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/party-ready-pork-roast

Roasted Broccoli

Meanwhile, whisk yogurt, oil, paprika, coriander, turmeric, garlic, and cayenne in a medium bowl. Season with salt. Add broccoli and toss to coat. Transfer broccoli mixture to a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet and arrange in a single layer. Roast broccoli until browned and stalks are tender, 15–20 minutes (unblanched broccoli may take as long as 25 minutes).

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/yogurt-and-spice-roasted-broccoli

Our Favorite Books for Food Lovers

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Books make the best gifts. There are just so many of them, and no matter how obscure the interests of the giftee, there’s bound to be a volume out there that suits them perfectly. In this year alone, even in the somewhat limited sphere of “books about food,” there have been some stellar books published about topics as varied as fermentation, surviving the apocalypse, a refugee’s journey from Southeast Asia to Oakland, and the rarefied world of haute cuisine.

Here, then, are just a few of our favorite books to give as gifts. Not all of them are newly published, but all of them are a pleasure to page through and learn from.

The Food Lab

We’re pretty sure most Serious Eats readers have a copy of The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science by Kenji López-Alt, since it’s indispensable, which means you know how great a gift it will be for anyone who is interested in improving the quality of the food coming out of their kitchen.

BraveTart

Stella Parks‘s BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts is a fantastic gift for anyone who has even a marginal interest in desserts. As with Kenji’s book, Stella’s contains a slew of recipes you won’t find on our site (including a foolproof and delicious buttermilk biscuit recipe), and offers an incredible amount of detail about the chemistry of baking. But what sets the book apart are the deep dives into the histories of different desserts, which are as entertaining and edifying as they are well-researched. (The one about Key lime pie caused a bit of a kerfuffle in Florida—sorry, Floridians, we’re with her on this one!)

Bangkok

Bangkok: Recipes and Stories from the Heart of Thailand by Serious Eats alum Leela Punyaratabandhu was one of our favorite books to come out last year, and we think it’s a great gift for anyone who loves cooking Thai food at home and wants to expand their culinary repertoire. It’s a steal for the noodle soups alone, but we particularly enjoy Punyaratabandhu’s seafood recipes, like the pan-fried salted king mackerel steak.

Hawker Fare

Hawker Fare: Stories and Recipes from a Refugee Chef’s Isan Thai and Lao Roots by James Syhabout, the chef behind the Michelin-starred Commis in Oakland, and award-winning author John Birdsall, is a great introduction to some of the flavors that make Isan and Lao cuisines unique. The recipes are wonderful, but what we find so compelling about the book is Syhabout’s story: a refugee who arrived with his family in the United States at the age of two, Syhabout went on to pursue a career in fine-dining. Only after establishing himself did he embark on a personal journey of discovery to find out more about the food of his forebears.

Provisions

Hoping to familiarize yourself with Jamaican food beyond jerk chicken and curried goat? Want to learn more about the evolution of Caribbean cuisine? Provisions: The Roots of Caribbean Cooking is the book for you. Suzanne and Michelle Rousseau share 150 bright and exciting vegetarian recipes inspired by the women who first taught the two sisters to cook. The recipes are accompanied by gorgeous photos, and a thorough history of Caribbean foodways. It’s an inspiring—and delicious—ode to the women who make Caribbean food great.

The Noma Guide to Fermentation

The hottest new nerdy book of kitchen geekery has to be The Noma Guide to Fermentation by Rene Redzepi and David Zilber. If you know someone who’s mixed koji up with dried fish to make a kind of fish sauce, this is the book for them. Also a good gift for anyone who’s into drying meats or pickling—it details methods and processes that take those hobbies a step further.

Season

Nik Sharma’s Season: Big Flavors, Beautiful Food has received an appropriate amount of praise from across the food media world (that is, a lot!), and while much is rightly made about the beautiful photography, we’re here to say that the recipes are the real draw. Sure, there’s Sharma’s way-better-than-storebought naan recipe, and the eggplant pilaf with pumpkin seeds is a marvel of texture and flavor, but the really impressive ones embody the kind of inventive cuisine that draws from multiple cultures to produce dishes that can only be described as emphatically, joyously American, like the roasted carrots with sesame, caraway, chili, and nori. Great for cooks looking for inspiration yet still hopelessly devoted to classic, comforting dishes.

Estela

We usually aren’t the biggest fans of the big and beautiful cookbooks put out by super fancy restaurants, in part because they have limited appeal to most home cooks, even if they are fascinating windows into the processes and methods of some of the best chefs in the world. We’ll make an exception for Estela by Ignacio Mattos, though, since it’s as inspiring as it is informative. The XO sauce recipe is a perfect example, but there are some dishes that just cry out to be made, like the beef tartare with sunchoke chips (it’s not actually beef, it’s bison, which Mattos says “tastes better” than raw beef does—the more you know!). Perfect for ambitious home cooks.

Joe Beef

Another exception to the rule about cookbooks and fancy restaurants is Joe Beef: Surviving the Apocalypse by Frederic Morin, David McMillan, and Meredith Erickson. This is a book for people who like to live extra large, and by that we mean people who are intrigued enough by the microwaved foie gras recipe to consider trying it some day. It is, as with the authors’ previous book, The Art of Living According to Joe Beef: A Cookbook of Sorts, a text that espouses an eating- and cooking-philosophy as much as it is a collection of recipes. Give it to a gourmand.

The Cooking Gene

Sometimes it takes a little while before the importance of a book really sinks in. I’ve written about why I think The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary History in the Old South by Michael Twitty should be read by just about everyone, but I also think it makes a wonderful gift for anyone who is interested in history, food, the history of food, and this terribly flawed but nonetheless beautiful thing we call America.

This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Serious Eats. Read more about our affiliate linking policy.

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Quick Gingerbread Cookies for Busy Holiday Bakers

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik. Video: Serious Eats Team]

Get the Recipe

Gingerbread cookies are one of my all-time favorites, not just around the holidays, but in general. They’re crisp, flavorful, and none too sweet, while their wafer-thin serving style also minimizes their richness, stretching a stick of butter into 60 cookies or more.

Like biscotti, gingerbread cookies have an excellent shelf life, so they can be made in bulk at the start of the season and enjoyed all month long (or longer).

My recipe starts with a host of holiday spices: ginger, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, nutmeg, black pepper (just a crack or two!), orange zest, and salt. The coriander and ginger create some bright notes, the nutmeg brings out the butteriness of the dough, cinnamon adds a classic vibe, and the touch of black pepper brings out the ginger’s heat. Finally, the orange zest works as an aromatic, helping to open up the spice blend and round off its edges.

gingerbread spices

The proportion of spices may seem like a lot, but given the yield, it works out to a rather modest dose per cookie.

Aside from the spices, it’s a very simple dough at heart: light brown sugar, molasses, butter, and no eggs at all!

brown sugar, butter, and mild molasses

Here, it’s important to use a mild molasses (often called baking molasses, light molasses, or Barbados molasses). This style comes from the first boiling of sugar cane, giving it a clean and bright flavor. Some darker styles will be fine, but avoid blackstrap molasses, which is too bitter and high in sodium for this recipe.

Along with the spices and leavening, the butter, sugar, and molasses are creamed together until fluffy and light. This process can be affected by the temperature of both the ingredients and equipment, so it’s important to use visual and textural cues rather than a strict timeline to determine when it’s ready.

The mixture should be substantially lighter, softer, and more voluminous than when it started (for more information, read up on our guide to the creaming method for cookies).

before and after the creaming method, and flour addition

When the mixture is soft and light, add the flour all at once and continue until it disappears and begins to clump around the paddle. Although the dough will not be entirely cohesive, it will come together in a smooth ball with a bit of gentle kneading on an unfloured surface.

Kneading the dough into a ball

That said, under-creaming and/or chilly winter conditions may prevent the butter from warming as it should in the mixer, making the dough seem crumbly and dry. So don’t rush the creaming process and, if needed, take steps to combat the effects of a cold environment (read up on our advice for working in a chilly winter kitchen).

After dividing the dough in half, it can be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated until needed, but with this recipe that’s an optional step (although it can help with timing).

The dough itself will be ready to roll as soon as it’s made; by dividing it in half, it will be much easier to handle, prevent sticking, and ensure an even thickness throughout.

prevent sticking by rolling and flipping the dough

As with any rolled dough, use ample flour both above and below the dough to prevent sticking. After rolling it to about seven inches, I like to dust the dough with more flour and then give it a flip before continuing to roll.

This ensures the bottom is well coated with flour, and capable of sliding across the work surface rather than sticking along the way.

using ample flour to roll a soft dough

The dough is cool, and relatively non-absorbent, so there’s no reason to skimp on flour. It’s the only thing preventing the dough from sticking, and the excess is easily brushed away in the end. Plus, the leftover flour needn’t go to waste, just sift it and use it to roll the second round of dough.

sifting the used flour

Gingerbread cookie dough can be rolled to any thickness, but I like my cookies thin and crisp, so I take the dough all the way down to an 1/8th of an inch since they’ll puff up a bit as they bake.

checking the dough with a ruler

For those who prefer soft and thick cookies, stop at 1/4th of an inch instead, but do bear in mind this will substantially reduce the recipe’s yield. This dough also retains an impression very well, if you happen to have an embossed rolling pin or holiday cookie stamps.

brushing away the excess flour and cutting the cookies

However it’s rolled, slide an offset spatula under the dough before cutting, to ensure it hasn’t stuck to the work surface. We don’t want to see any lost limbs when lifting up gingerbread men, reindeer, and snowflakes.

This is an occasion where it will help to have an assortment of cutters, both large and small, to help get the highest yield from each sheet of dough. The more you can cut with each round, the less the dough will need to be re-worked, and the more tender the cookies will be.

before and after baking

Because the gingerbread cookie dough won’t spread much in the oven, the cutouts can be nestled fairly close together on the baking sheet. I like to bake them until firm and dry to the touch, but not too dark overall. But bake-time is as much a matter of personal preference as it is technical consideration, as darker cookies will have a more bittersweet, spicy profile.

After the initial round of rolling, the dough scraps can be gathered, gently kneaded into a ball, and re-rolled to cut once more.

baking off the scraps

Beyond that, I don’t recommend a third round of rolling and cutting, since the resulting cookies can be quite tough. Instead, I prefer to bake off all the leftover scrap pieces, as they can be ground into crumbs to make the crust for a holiday-themed cheesecake (no-bake or otherwise).

Fresh from the oven, the cookies will be soft and fragile, but they will become crisp and sturdy as they cool. Not sturdy enough to build a house (for that, I prefer a heartier, construction-style gingerbread), but certainly sturdy enough for care packages and holiday gifting.

Gingerbread cookies don’t need frosting, since they’re crisp and rich and totally satisfying without it, but royal icing is a fun and traditional way to further personalize the cookies.

frosting gingerbread with royal icing

For those on the fence about royal icing, I’ve written a guide to 4 major upgrades that can substantially improve its flavor and texture. And for those who love it already, those tips and tricks may just bump it up a notch.

Keep the icing plain and simple, or consult our video tutorial on how to decorate Christmas cookies like a boss.

finished tray of frosted gingerbread

With or without frosting, the gingerbread itself will be light and crisp, whether enjoyed on its own, as part of a holiday cookie assortment, or paired with a strong cup of coffee.

inside a gingerbread

Get the Recipe

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Miso-Almond Butter Cookies

These cookies are rich and chewy without being too sweet! The chocolate dip is a must – it balances out the saltiness & adds some interest. I used red miso and it tastes great. They came out a bit oily, but I might have just added a little too much butter. I recommend using 1 tbsp balls for more cookies.

AnonymousToronto, ON12/13/18

I made this recipe vegan by subbing vegan butter and a flax egg and they turned out so good! They’re sweet, salty, and rich with a crisp edge and chewy middle. Definitely do not skip the chocolate dip!

cassidy.haightRichmond, VA12/12/18

These came out perfectly! I chose to use 1 tbsp balls instead of the recommended 2 tbsp. They are beautifully rich and perfectly baked. I’m extremely happy. I followed the suggestion for melting chocolate in 20-second intervals, I ended up needing 2 cups of chocolate wafers however to coat the smaller cookies adequately. I will definitely​ be making these again and soon!

AnonymousOakland California12/12/18

Wasn’t sure which kind of miso to get, so I went with traditional red miso. But am curious if this recipe is intended to be made with sweet white miso. My first batch using the suggested 2 tbsp of dough came out gigantic and took a long time to bake, so went with a single tbsp which was more ideal. Chocolate didn’t come out especially smooth, would have appreciate more explanation on how to melt the chocolate for a smoother finish.

AnonymousLos Anglees12/11/18

Admittedly I was weirded out by the premise of adding miso to my cookies. However, I trust Chris Morocco and therefore decided to give the recipe a try because I have really enjoyed savory-forward cookies (with tahini, etc.) in the past. I was really pleased with how they turned out! The miso is not overpowering but adds a really nice and rich flavor profile. They’re fairly complex tasting, so they are the kind of cookies that you’ll not be tempted to eat a whole plate of, but that’s a good thing during the holiday season…and fitting with the Healthyish brand! Technical note: I only baked them 12 minutes and felt that was enough. Also don’t skip or skimp on the chocolate – they really add a tasty element!

AnonymousKent, Ohio12/11/18

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/miso-almond-butter-cookies

Food Glorious Food! Frugal Living – Delicious Food on a Budget – Toad In The Hole –

Toad In The Hole – Frugal Living & Delicious Food on a Budget


Frugalism.pngSource


We’ve been living the #frugal #life for the past year now, after deciding that we were spending far too much of our hard earned cash on overly expensive food, from rip off supermarkets and local shops.
I love to cook, and am the head-chef in our house as well as doing the weekly ‘Friday Big Shop’ at Aldi. I work full time at a Special Educational Needs school during the week, and rarely get a chance to muster something yummy up of an evening, but I always cook for my little family on a Sunday.


Chickens.jpgOur newest family members – Dorothy and Annie – They free range and produce the best eggs!


A firm favourite that I cook (as voted for by my better half and kids) is the good ole’ British favourite

‘Toad In The Hole’


Toad in the hole2.jpg

Now, to my non-British cousins here, this meal possibly sounds like a weird dish that ‘The Twits’ would make! But rest assured, it’s a delicious and belly-filling experience that you need to try. Made with ‘Yorkshire pudding batter mix and the best free range quality sausages, this really is a wonderful Autumn into (dare I say it) Winter warmer.
You can also use vegetarian sausages if you’re a veggie too!


There’s even a Vegan recipe too, which will please my besty @d-vine and other vegans reading this, which you can find here on the VeganPunks webpage


Vegan Toad.jpg


Here’s the ingredients and method for you to try, there are loads of recipes online, but I’ve adapted my own and it works a treat every time! so trust me folks!


Cost breakdown – In GBP ££All Ingredients are from the supermarket Aldi


  • 8 Cumberland Sausages (72% pork) – £1.39
  • Plain Flour – 45p 2kg (bulk buy which lasts for weeks)
  • 6 Large Free range Eggs – Free from Dorothy and Annie
  • Olive Oil – 1l – £2.29
  • Semi-Skimmed Milk 6 pint – £1.48 (best to buy a large jug for our family)
  • Salt and Pepper – £1.00 together

Preparation time -30 mins to 1 hourCooking time – 30 mins to 1 hourServes – 2 children & 2 Adults


Preheat your oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
The hotter the better, which will really help that batter rise!


You will need this equipment


  • A rectangular glass oven dish (I find that the batter doesn’t stick as much with these)
  • Weighing scales
  • Whisk
  • Measuring Jug with ml/fl oz
  • Preheated oven at 200c/400f (Moderatley hot)

Ingredients


  • 4 eggs
  • 140g/5oz – Plain flour
  • 200ml/7fl oz – Semi- skimmed milk
  • 1 pinch of – Salt and Ground black pepper
  • 8 good quality – Pork sausages
  • 3 tbsp – Olive oil
  • pinch of dried mixed herbs and onions

Method


Here’s how to make the batter


Sift the plain flour into a large mixing bowl, then add the salt and pepper for seasoning.
Make a well in the centre of the flour and crack in the eggs. Using a wooden spoon, gradually beat the eggs into the flour then slowly beat in the milk until the batter is the consistency of double cream.


Yorkshire 1.jpg


Stir in the mixed herbs, cover and leave to stand for 30 minutes.
Place the sauasages in the dish, drizzle with olive oil and pop into the preheated oven for 10 minutes.
I like to prick holes in them to let the fat out, this will help with the non-sticking process.
Pour the batter over the hot sausages in the oven dish and Immediately return to the oven and cook for 35-40 minutes or until well-risen and golden-brown.


Yorkshire 2.jpg


I like serve it with different veg each week so today I chose some delicious new potatoes and garden peas, with thick good ole’ Bisto Best gravy!
I also like some hot English mustard on the side for the sausages and mint sauce on the peas.


Dinner.jpg


Straight from the oven! the aromas are mouth watering and incredibly inviting…I bet you wish you had smellavision!


I hope you enjoyed my cooking blog post, and that you’re now rushing off to the kitchen to cook up this classic ‘Great British’ favourite! Happy cooking and eating folks, and please post your pictures in the comments section if you managed to re-create this dish!Kindest
DC


Toad in the hole.jpg

Avozilla 4 Pound Avocado

Source: wellandgood.com

Out of Australia is a weighty avocado they have dubbed the Avozilla.  It can weigh several pounds and can be as big as your head.  It originated in South Africa and is a hybrid between the West Indian and Guatemalan varieties.

A farm in Queensland imported some 400 avocado trees and another farmer in Bundaberg has started more than 2,000 of these avocado trees.  The large avocados are a big hit in Australia.

One might think that since the fruit (yes, an avocado is considered a fruit) is so large that its taste will suffer.  But based on people whom have tried the fruit admit that it is just as buttery as the well known Hass or Shepard varieties.  In fact some are saying that it spreads more easily.

Unfortunately, the Avozilla is not available in the US.

Staying Cool

Source: loveandfoodforeva.com

The heat level where I live is unbearable.  I have a good supply of popsicles but I heard of this cool treat that looks more refreshing.  I am not familiar with some of the ingredients but there is an Asian Market that is very close.

I was able to find most of the ingredients except the ube ice cream so I substituted it with a rainbow sherbet.  Not sure what ube tastes like but it is a sweet yam, so now I will be on the look out for it as I would like to know what it takes like.

Here’s the recipe but once you get the ingredients it really needs no instructions on how to put it together.

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup sweet beans

1/2 cup sweet palm fruit

1/2 cup coconut gelatin (nata de coco)

1/2 cup shredded young coconut

1/2 cup jackfruit

1/4 cup prepared ube

8 cups shaved or crushed ice

1 can evaporated milk

1 quart mango ice cream

1 quart ube ice cream

1/4 cup crispy rice cereal

DIRECTIONS

Start with 4 tall glasses. In each glass add 2 Tablespoons each of the following: sweet beans, sweet palm fruit, nata de coco, shredded young coconut, and jackfruit. Then add 1 Tablespoon of prepared ube to each glass.

Fill each glass to the top with about 2 cups of shaved ice, then top with 3-4 Tablespoons of evaporated milk.

Onto the top of each glass, add one scoop each of mango ice cream and ube ice cream. Top with 1 Tablespoon of crispy rice cereal.

Honestly it was good but they best thing about it was it was cold.

While I was out, I picked up supplies for my old stand by.  Hawaiian shaved ice.  When I lived in Hawaii I found this place called Matsumoto’s and they are famous for their shaved ice.

Source: matsumotoshavedice.com

I bought a ice shaving machine many years ago and it still works.  While I was at the Asian store, they had the red azuki beans.  For the syrup, I use Koolaid but when I add the water I make it real sweet so don’t use the directions on the packet.

They way they make it is to put in a scoop of the azuki beans with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.  Cover it well with a mound of shaved ice.  Drizzle the Koolaid concentrate over the ice.

Stay cool and enjoy the treats.

 

Memorial Day Easy Side Dish

Source: bbc.com

Before I start, I want all to remember what this day is all about. I do realize that we all look forward to this holiday as the beginning of summer. As a kid, I knew it as the ending of the school year. Memorial Day is a day to remember and to honor those whom sacrificed their future for the rest of us to enjoy the modicum (I don’t use this word for sarcasm) of freedom.

We were invited to a potluck and were asked to bring appetizers. A favorite is baked Brie or Camembert. It is like a fondue in a small package and it is so simple to put together. If you make this make sure you bring a few because just one will not cut it. You’ll probably eat it all before you get there.

INGREDIENTS

Boxes of Camembert or Brie cheese – I recommend 3 or more.
Garlic – about 1/2 a head for each box of cheese
Butter – about 1/2 a stick for each box of cheese
Artisan bread – I like to use Baguettes

DIRECTIONS

Unbox the cheese and place in a baking dish with high sides. Add the butter and the peeled garlic. Heat in a oven at 300 to 350 degrees F. It will only take 15 to 30 minutes. Just bake till the cheese is melted, you will need to break open the outer crust to check the cheese.

Mexican Rice – My Version of the Recipe

This is a basic, restaurant-style Mexican rice recipe, and can be used as a side dish. I cook this dish especially for guests or when there is an occasion, such as a one-dish party.

The key to it is the use of seasoning.

Ingredients

In original recipe, you can use the ingredients listed below, but you can also use Taco seasoning (which is optional).

  • Vegetable oil – 3 tablespoons
  • Uncooked long-grain rice – 1 cup
  • Garlic salt – 1 teaspoon
  • Ground cumin – 1/2 teaspoon
  • Chopped onion – 1/4 cup
  • Tomato sauce – 1/2 cup
  • Chicken broth – 2 cups

Directions

  1. Heat oil in a sauce pan over medium heat.
  2. Add rice to it.
  3. Sprinkle salt and cumin while stirring constantly until golden and puffed
  4. Add onions and cook for few minutes
  5. Then add tomato sauce and chicken broth and bring it to a boil
  6. Reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for around 15 to 20 minutes till liquid is almost absorbed and rice is tender.

Some adaptations

  • You can sprinkle more spices to make a different version of the recipe
  • You can also fry an onion in oil until it is golden brown before adding rice.
  • You can use sea salt instead of garlic salt.
  • You can also add chopped bell pepper that is added with the onions about half way through the sauteing of the rice.

Fish Taco Recipe

Today, I brought to you this easy and fast recipe, which is one of my favorite recipes and I often cook it for dinner. Please do try it, and let me know in the comments your opinion about it.

Ingredients

  • All-purpose flour – 1 cup
  • Cornstarch – 2 tablespoon
  • Baking powder – 1 teaspoon
  • Salt – ½ teaspoon
  • Mayonnaise – ½ cup
  • Egg – 1
  • Beer – 1 cup
  • Lime – 1 (juiced)
  • Jalapeno pepper – 1 (minced)
  • Ground cayenne pepper – 1 teaspoon
  • Minced capers – 1 teaspoon
  • Dried dill weed – ½ teaspoon
  • Plain yogurt – ½ cup
  • Dried oregano – ½ teaspoon
  • Ground cumin – ½ teaspoon
  • Cod fillets – 1 pound (cut into pieces)
  • Corn tortillas – 1 package
  • Cabbage – ½ (finely shredded)
  • Oil for frying

How to cook?

Beer batter: Mix well all-purpose flour, starch, salt and baking powder in a bowl. In another bowl, blend well egg and beer, and then add it to the flour mixture and stir well.

White sauce: Mix mayonnaise and yogurt in a bowl, and gradually add lime juice while stirring in order to achieve uniform consistency. Season with oregano, cumin, cayenne, dill, jalapeno and capers. Heat oil to 150-190 Celsius.

Fish Sprinkle flour on fish pieces, dip them into the batter, and deep fry until golden brown and crispy. Slightly fry tortilla, but it should not be crispy.

To serve: In a tortilla, place the fish, top it with the cabbage and put white sauce, and wrap it, if you like.

Some other variations – You can substitute light sour cream for yogurt and lemon for lime – Fresh minced cilantro can be used instead of oregano – You can also grill it instead of frying – Tortillas can also be slightly grilled than fried.

Guacamole – Avocado Salad Recipe

This avocado salad recipe is our favorite. Surely, avocado has lot of fat in it, but it is good fat that helps rejuvenate skin and keep it supple.

Ingredients

  • Avocados – 3 (peeled, pitted &mashed)
  • Lime – 1 (juiced)
  • Roma tomatoes – 2 (diced)
  • Onion – ½ cup (diced)
  • Minced garlic – 1 teaspoon
  • Ground cayenne pepper – 1 pinch
  • Cilantro – 3 tablespoons (freshly chopped)
  • Salt – 1/2 teaspoon (or to taste)

Directions

This salad recipe would take 10 minutes to prepare.

  • In a bowl, mix together the mashed avocados, lime juice and salt.
  • Add onion, garlic, tomatoes and cilantro and mix well.
  • Finally stir in cayenne pepper.

You can serve it immediately, but for best taste, refrigerate it for an hour or so.

Some adaptations 

You can also add cumin and a little extra virgin olive oil to the mix.

Some tips 

Mash the avacados with the salt and lime prior to the other ingredients. It helps to meld the flavors, and prevents the guacamole from going brown Choose blemish-free avocados which when squeezed lightly feel juicy. Add lot of lime juice which not only make it delicious but also keeps it from turning brown. You can have it with warm tortillas. Use red onions which are more delicious and healthy (IMO)

Disclaimer

I shared my knowledge with you that I gained from my own experiments with recipes and from watching recipes on TV and YouTube.

Tyson Partnering With Israeli Biotech

Source: christianjournal.com

I thought GMO was bad news, this in my opinion is just as bad or worse. Not being a vegan, I enjoy a big juicy steak occasionally and the thought of eating something grown in a lab does not strike me as appealing. Tyson Foods has partnered up with a biotech company to develop meat in a lab.

The Israeli company, Future Meat Technologies is working on creating what they call cultured meat. This meat product is not from animals but is grown in a lab. The cultured meat requires less water and produced about 96% less greenhouse gases. It may seem like a win – win but some things can’t be replicated.

The future appears to be becoming an inhospitable place for humans. Workers are being replaced by robots, jobs requiring higher intelligence will being replaced by AI, police will be replaced by robocop or using ‘pre crime’ we will not need police and livestock is being replaced by chemical concoctions. Now I would be in favor of replacing politicians with something useful, maybe penny candy.

Perhaps this is the start of people eating soylent green.

Source: christianjournal.com

Shave and a Haircut – 2 Eggs

Source: thedailycoin.org

For an explanation of the title, back (even before my time) there was this saying that went ‘shave and a haircut – 2 bits’, I think 2 bits was a quarter. What’s taking place in Venezuela has gotten so money is pretty much irrelevant and produce is king. This is exactly what happens when a country goes into hyperinflation, money goes irrelevant.

According to Fabiola Zerpa, a haircut now costs 5 bananas and 2 eggs. When a country’s economic system fail, people will revert back to the basics. Here is an except from Bloomberg’s ‘Life in Caracas’ series; “The other day, I made a baguette for parking swap. I had time but, as usual, no bolivars. The attendant at the cash only lot had some bills but no chance to leave his post during the fleeting moments the bakery nearby put his favorite bread on sale. The deal: he let me leave my car, and I came back with an extra loaf, acquired with my debit card. He reimbursed me – giving me a bonus of spare change for my pocket”. A perfect example of bartering.

The point is that if / when this comes to your hometown, your best tools are your ability to grow food and / or have some viable skills. Gardening will provide you with not only something to eat but also a commodity to trade. Simple skills can also be bartered; skills like fixing a car, cutting hair, hunting and simple first aid will become a viable bartering tool.

It may seems unrealistic when you still have a semblance of normalcy but just look at Venezuela, it took just a few months for it to go from a normal functioning society to shambles. It is very possible that it could happen in your hometown. Learning skills, how to do things and becoming a little self sufficient will never be useless even if you don’t need to use it.

Source: thedailycoin.org

Kachnar benefits


Its botanical name is Bauhinia variegata. It has many health benefits. Its flower buds are used as a vegetable. It can be cooked with chicken, mutton, beef , potato and with peas. This plant is variety/specie of flowering tree. It looks so beautiful when at bloom. These flowers has good aesthetic value.

Its buds are cooked before flowering and so tasty having enormous health benefits. It is good for stomach health and regulates blood pressure and blood cholesterol.
Its is also used as a ornamental purpose due to its beauty. It can be planted near roads for its esthetic value.

Photography in Spring – Microblog


Photography in spring


 

Spring is an incredibly beautiful time of the year and is always a good idea to have a camera in your pocket.

The best camera you can ever own is the one in your pocket! yes that’s right, your mobile phone! I’m lucky to own a Huawei P10 with duel Leica Lenses which produces stunning pictures.

Here’s a small selection of my spring and early summer pics.


 

cof

bty

.

 

Production Technology of Moringa


Moringa oleifera is a evergreen tree. It has enormous health benefits. Its leaves, pods and flowers are full of vitamins and minerals. It can be propagated through stem cutting and also with seeds. Its exact sowing time is From first week of February to first week of march. But it can be grown under green house in polythene tube during round the year. Its leaves and pods can also be used as a fodder for livestock. Its flower buds and pods can also be used as a vegetable which is full of vitamins and minerals.

 

Moringa pods as a vegetable


Moringa pods are used as a vegetable when they are in tender stage. The pods are rich source of protein and vitamins. Its vegetable is so tasty and can be cooked with beef, mutton and chicken.

Top health benefits of Green Tea. (Part 2)

Green tea has innumerous health benefits. There are many varieties of green tea in the world. More or less all the varieties have common benefits. These are as follows;

 

3. Curing of Flue and Constipation.

Constipation directly relates with the digestion of food in the stomach, therefore when food is easily digested then bowl movement regulated, ultimately constipation problem cured. If we use lemon in the green tea then the circle of flue completed very fast, therefore flue problem solved easily without antibiotics.

4. Controlling Obesity

It is helpful in regulating the metabolism, which results in controlling the obesity. Obesity is the mother of all the health problems, therefore if obesity is controlled then all the health problems solved. Use green tea without sugar for the controlling of the obesity. Green tea also normalize the BMI (body mass index).

5. Improving health of sexual organs for controlling Impotency

If we use green tea with honey, then it improves the health of sexual organs. Therefore it controls impotency.


Images source: 1,2, 3


Thanks a lot, for taking time to read this.

 

Top health benefits of Green Tea. (part 1)


Green tea has innumerous health benefits. There are many varieties of green tea in the world. More or less all the varieties have common benefits. These are as follows;

1. Curing of Stomach Problems.

• As stomach is the main part of humane body, because all the food items we eat are digested in the stomach and energy is produced for the function of all body parts, therefore it would be true that the green tea is a great tonic for stomach functions and problems.
• It helps the food digestion.

2. Regulating the Blood Pressure and Sugar level.

If we use green tea with lemon during early in the morning when stomach is empty then;
• It regulates the circulation of blood.
• It regulates the blood pressure.
• Sugar patients can use it without sugar.

Images source: 1,2.

 

Where the words “Tea” and “Chai” came from?


In different regions of the globe people Usually use different words for tea but there are some amazing similarities in these words because almost all of these words are derived from only two origins. Why they call it these particular words? there are particular reasons & history behind these words. Some call it “tea” while others call it “cha” or “chai” & they have two groups & both have Chinese origin.
Recent studies show that tea’s origin was China. It is also believed that India or Taiwan or other neighbor areas can also be included in the first known areas where tea was produced in ancient times. Due to its bitter taste it was called “tu”, which was used for bitter vegetables. In 7th century this word was changed to “te” & in different Chinese dialects its translated as “cha”. There are China’s two languages where from the both words are derived, Sinitic & Min Nan. the both are varieties of languages, in Sinitic its called “cha” & in Min Nan its called “te”. If tea reached to us through sea than we call it “tea”, “tee”, “te” or “thee” other wise we would name it as”cha”, “chai” “chay” or “shay”. In Chinese coastal regions they call it “te” because they use Min Nan dialect. The Silk road is also being used for thousands of years to supply tea to other regions of the world & its supply centers are the Chinese areas where Sinitic dialect is used & they call it “cha”.

Sources:
https://qz.com/1176962/map-how-the-word-tea-spread-over-land-and-sea-to-conquer-the-world/
http://www.lcsd.gov.hk/ce/Museum/Arts/7thingsabouttea/en/ch1_4_0.htm

 

Moringa: Main health benefits


Its botanical name is Moringa oleifera. The propagation is through seed and from vegetative parts. Green tea of its leaves is beneficial for sugar patients. It is antioxidants and bio-active plant compound. Its fresh leaves juice is organic growth enhancer. Its flower buds and pods are used as vegetable which is rich in vitamins. It lowers down the blood sugar. It is beneficial for lowering of blood cholesterol.
Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Starr_060921-9048_Moringa_oleifera.jpg

Lemons

Lemon belong to the
Kingdom: plantae
Genus:citrus
Species :C.limon

Lemons are rich in vitamin C

Benefit of lemon
it is use for weight loss remedy.

Lemon Water Flushes Out Toxins And Is Extremely Beneficial For The Body

Warm lemon water serves as the perfect ‘good morning drink’, as it aids the digestive system and makes the process of eliminating the waste products from the body easier. It prevents the problem of constipation and diarrhea, by ensuring smooth bowel functions.
Lemon is a bleaching agent lemon juice can be use for lightening of skin
Lemon juice can get rid of stretch marks by mixing lemon with baking soda .

Coconut

Coconut belong to kingdom plantae
Family Arecaceae
Genus cocos
Specie nucifera
Unlike some other plants, the palm treehas neither a tap root nor root hairs, but has a fibrous root system Coconuts are known for their versatility ranging from food to cosmetics
The palm produces both the female and male flowers on the same inflorescence; thus, the palm is monoecious .
Benefit of coconut.
Coconut Oil Contains Fatty Acids With Potent Medicinal Properties
Coconut Oil Can Increase Fat Burning

Obesity is one of the biggest health problems in the world

Coconut Oil Can Kill Harmful Microorganisms

The 12-carbon lauric acid makes up about 50% of the fatty acids in coconut oil.

Coconut Oil Can Reduce Your Hunger, Helping You Eat Less

One interesting feature of the fatty acids in coconut oil is that they can reduce your hunger.

The Fatty Acids in Coconuts May Reduce Seizures

A so-called ketogenic (very low carb, very high fat) diet is currently being studied to treat various disorders

Coconut Oil Can Protect Your Skin, Hair and Dental Health

Coconut oil has many uses that have nothing to do with eating it.

Free Auto Bitcoin Earning tricks & Tips 2018

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Copyright Videos tricks 2018 for YouTube channels

4-Nature-Wallpapers-2014-1_ukaavUI.jpgHi there guys and welcome to tube machanics where I use my screncapture videos to show you the tools that …will make building and growing your channel a breezeIn todays video we are going to be looking at how to use other peoples videos on youtube without being …ponish by youtube copyright stirke.Here is a video I created and used a short video clip from one of the videos of a channel …called slow motion guys… the aim was to show the effect of slow motion since the video was about how …to play youtube videos in slowmotion and then with the hope of linking back to the original video.I thought at the time that by using just this short clip not a greater potion of it adding some …value to it and by using my own voice over will save me from copyright strike.Well as you can see I was wrong…. when you click for more details about the strike you will see …here it says the strike is because of visual content.To cut the long story short, since then I have learned my leason, I now know exactly were to get …videos to download and tweek a little to reuse on my videos.Now if you have been in the same situation or you are simply looking for extra video content that other …people havealready created to remix on your next new video then stay tuned for that and much more coming up.On youtube creative common video library you will find tons of videos you can use. what you should also understand …here is that when you just download and reupload the same video, sometimes you can still get a copyright strike.we will talk about that a little later in this video.But first to get to this page you have to be logged in to your youtube channel click on the …icon image on the top right of the page and then on creator studioOn the left side menu sroll down and click on the create tab and then on video editor.On the video editor page click on the creative common sign here . Now you can use the search bar …hee to search for the type of video you want to use.You are allowed to use any video here for your video creation. You can remix the video right here on …youtube by using the video editor tool hereYou can also download the video and use on any video editing tool. To downlod the video simply right click …on the video and copy the url linkOpen the video on a new page Go to the url on your brwoser and just after the dot type …in ss and hit the enter button on your keyboard.that will take you to this online service were you can eaily download the video.Now you can not just turn arround and upload the exact video thinking you will not get a strike for …it. You have to tweek it a little before uploading on your channel if you want to avoid the strike.Here are a few ways to do that. 1 By reducing the size of the videoChnaging the audio of the video…if you want to use the music audio make sure to cross check its copyright …policy. You can find a video that will show you how to to do that by clicking on the card …icon on the top right.Cutting and remixing the video slidesSO THERE you have it how to use other peoples videos on youtube without any copy right strike. Not I …will like to know in the comment area if you have used any of the creative common videos on youtube …and what were your challengesDont also forget to give this video a thumbs up and also share it to your friends on other social …media sites.If you are new to this channel make to subscribe for more tube mechanic videos like this every tuesdays and …thursdays of the week.
Don,t foget follow and vote
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Prawns.

Fresh water prawns.They were cooking for me.

My own.

Sapota has given me by own garden.

Sweets.

This sweet box has given  me by  a church.

 

Spring Has Finally Sprung! Do you Love Gardening and Permaculture?

Spring has finally sprung here in Derbyshire, UK

I’ve managed to get out into our lovely cottage garden this afternoon to assess the potential damage caused by ‘The Beast From The East’ which hit us two weeks ago.


This adverse #weather forced many parts of the UK to a complete standstill on the Wednesday, and through to the weekend. Schools and businesses had to close and some shops even ran out of supplies for the rest of that week. Now, for those of you used to 10-12 inches 0r 30cm #snow during winter, maybe laughing at this amusing anecodte, but we’re just not geared up for that kind of freakish weather here! It absolutely battered our little rural village, with 2 foot snow drifts, which was overly exagerrated by the 80mph winds which caused face melting blizzard like conditions. We’re a few miles from the nearest main travel route, but Luckily, the snow plough arrived early on the Saturday morning to clear our lane. The garden has survived surprisingly well considering we had some -6c thermometer readings for 5 consecutive days. A few of my outdoor bonsai and some bulbs have perished, and I can live with that. All is good in my horticulture world and I look forward to many more green fingered evenings this#spring and #summer, if I can drag myself away from #Steemit and#Discord for long enough!


The Crocus is one of my favourite first blossoms in spring.


Permaculture has been on my mind recently and I’m finding more and more ways to embrace frugalism and sustainibilty. Composting old fruit and veg and recycling everyday items to use around the garden, have been on my list of priorities last year and going forward ito this growing season.


I now grow our strawberries in these re-purposed nylon builders bags, which are great for keeping those hungry ground dwelling creatures from gorging on these sweet fructose rich fruits!

IMG_20180313_175508.jpg

What is Permaculture?

I was really intrigued about this way of living, after talking to my fellow horticulture friend Huw Richards of @huwsnursery – We met after talking about me writing some instrumental music for his YouTube videos, and how gardening and growning your own food is such an inteseting and rewarding way of life.
Huw has an extensive knowledge of homesteading and permaculture, which you can learn from his very popular YouTube Channel 
But I wanted to know more, so I set about everyones favourite search tool#Google and found a website dedicated to this sustainable way of living.

Here’s some info from the home page of their website –https://www.permaculture.co.uk/what-is-permaculture

Permaculture is an innovative framework for creating sustainable ways of living. It is a practical method of developing ecologically harmonious, efficient and productive systems that can be used by anyone, anywhere.
By thinking carefully about the way we use our resources – food, energy, shelter and other material and non-material needs – it is possible to get much more out of life by using less. We can be more productive for less effort, reaping benefits for our environment and ourselves, for now and for generations to come.

This is the essence of permaculture – the design of an ecologically sound way of living – in our households, gardens, communities and businesses. It is created by cooperating with nature and caring for the earth and its people.

Permaculture is not exclusive – its principles and practice can be used by anyone, anywhere:

City flats, yards and window boxes
Suburban and country houses/gardens
Allotments and smallholdings
Community spaces
Farms and estates
Countryside and conservation areas
Commercial and industrial premises
Educational establishments

source


Really interesting reading I’m sure you’ll agree. I recommend you visit Huw’s channel and the website I mentioned, as they have so many amazing ideas for us all to try, however large or small, or rural/urban your area is. There’s no excuse not to grow something of your own, to then enjoy natures bounty for yourself.



Our composter full to the brim ready for our wrigglers to do their magic!


New seedlings grown from last years Naga and Birds eye chili fruit,s that I cultivated in our poly-tunnel.


Parsnip seedlings are doing very well under cover too – They tend to be quite a tricky crop to cultivate and car for.


Spring onions benefit from an early sowing under cover – These were sown early January to be transplanted outside after the last frost.


I went all exotic last year and bought some banana seeds online to try at home.
This variety of banana is ‘Musa balbisiana’ and was sown last February. The fruit are between a blue and green colour and are considered inedible because of the seeds they contain. I did read that agriculturists must of cooked and eaten these centuries ago to establish how to modify the heavily cultivated varities we consume today. As you can see, it’s doing really well so far, much to my good lady’s delight of my plants being spread all over the house on any empty windowsill available.


Rhubarb is one our summer favourites and is so easy to grow, as nothing seems to like to eat it! I make a crumble from it by chopping the stalks into chunks and covering with the mixture which is made from flour, sugar and butter –

Recipe courtesy of BBC Good Food

THICK VANILLA CUSTARD

Heat 600ml double cream until steaming but not boiling. Meanwhile, mix together 6 egg yolks, 4 tbsp caster sugar, 2 tsp cornflour and ½ tsp vanilla extract in a bowl. Pour the cream onto the eggs, stirring continuously as you pour. Pour the whole lot back into the saucepan the cream came from and place over a medium heat. Stir until it thickens, about 10 mins, then pass through a sieve and serve.
source


Another successful trial was to grow one of my favourite fruits, Nectarines! I sowed this seed last March which I got from a fruit that I ate.
you have to carefully crack open the stone to reveal the slim oval shaped seed inside.
I didn’t do anything special to it either, but did purchase a heated propagator for £30 online which has been an amazing investment. It germinates seeds very quickly by keeping them at a constant 21c.



Our cottage was built in the 1850s of Early Victorian England and some of the plants have probably been in the ground a lon long time. This is my favourite sash window which looks kind of bare at the moment as we’re just coming out of winter. I’ll try and grow a grapvine each side on the trellis this year. It’s sheltered and get’s lots of sun too as we have a south facing garden.


The Pansies I sowed in November are now budding nicely.


I also love to upcycle wood, so I made this nesting box. I’ve seen some interested birds hanging around in the tree opposite so they’ll hopefull be moving in soon!

I hope you enjoyed my first indepth gardening post and liked the Rhubarb crumble recipe too!
Let’s get out in our gardens, rooftop spaces and kitchens and grow some food! It’s fun and good for the soul!
Many thanks
Mr Bloom


Yes, I made this chair too!

Food Glorious Food! Frugal Living – Delicious Food on a Budget – Toad In The Hole –

Toad In The Hole – Frugal Living & Delicious Food on a Budget

We’ve been living the #frugal #life for the past 6 months now, after deciding that we were spending far too much of our hard earned cash on overly expensive food, from rip off supermarkets and local shops.
I love to cook, and am the head-chef in our house as well as doing the wekkly ‘Friday Big Shop’ at Aldi. I work full time at a Special Educational Needs school during the week, and rarely get a chance to muster something yummy up of an evening, but I always cook for my little family on a Sunday.

Source

A firm favourite that I cook as voted for by my better half and my kids, is the good ole’ British favourite
‘Toad In The Hole’
Now, to my non-British cousins here, this meal possibly sounds like a weird dish that ‘The Twits’ would make! But rest assured, it’s a delicious and bellyfilling experience that you need to try.

Source

Here’s the ingredients and method for you to try, they are loads of recipes online, but I’ve adapted my own and it works a treat every time! so trust me folks!
Cost breakdown – In GBP ££
All In Ingredients are from Aldi –
8 Cumberland Sausages (72% pork) – £1.39
Plain Flour – 45p 2kg (bulk buy which lasts for weeks)
6 Large Free range Eggs – 89p
Olive Oil – 1l – £2.29
Semi-Skimmed Milk 6 pint – £1.48 (best to buy a large jug in our house @meesterboom
Salt and Pepper – £1.00 together

Preparation time -30 mins to 1 hour
Cooking time – 30 mins to 1 hour
Serves – 2 children & 2 Adults

Preheat your oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
The hotter the better, which will really help that batter rise!
You will need this equipment
A rectangular glass oven dish (I find that the batter doesn’t stick as much with these)
Weighing scales
a whisk
a measuring Jug with ml/fl oz
And a preheated oven at 200c/400f (Moderatley hot)

Ingredients –
4 eggs
140g/5oz – Plain flour
200ml/7fl oz – Semi- skimmed milk
1 pinch of – Salt and Ground black pepper
8 good quality – Pork sausages
3 tbsp – Olive oil
Optional extra – Dried Mixed herbs and onions.

Method
Here’s how to make the batter – sift the plain flour into a large mixing bowl, then add the salt and pepper for seasoning.
Make a well in the centre of the flour and crack in the eggs. Using a wooden spoon, gradually beat the eggs into the flour then slowly beat in the milk until the batter is the consistency of double cream.

Stir in the mixed herbs, cover and leave to stand for 30 minutes.
Place the sauasages in the dish, drizzle with olive oil and pop into the preheated oven for 10 minutes.
I like to prick holes in them to let the fat out, this will help with the non-sticking process.
Pour the batter over the hot sausages in the oven dish and Immediately return to the oven and cook for 35-40 minutes or until well-risen and golden-brown.

I like serve it with diffent veg each week so today I chose some delicious new potatoes and garden peas, with thick good ole’ Bisto Best gravy!
I also like some hot English mustard on the side for the sausages and mint sauce on the peas.

Straight from the oven! the aromas are mouthwaterngly incredible…I bet you wish you had smellavision!

7. And Most Importantly…ENJOY!!!

I hope you enjoyed my very first cooking blog post here on #Steemthat, and that you’re rushing off to the kitchen right now to cook up this classic ‘Great British’ favourite!
Happy cooking and eating folks
Kindest

Darren

Pisang Coklat Crispy

Hai sahabat stishitian…saya mau share resep pisang coklat nih bisa buat cemilan nanti sore lho…

 

Bahan
1 bungkus kulit lumpia (saya guna kulit yang dibuat sendiri)
5 buah pisang raja
Mises ceres
Susu coklat

Cara Membuat

Pisang raja dibagi menjadi 2 bagian, letakkan diatas kulit lumpia tambahkan ceres dan susu kemudian gulung dan goreng dalam minyak panas hingga kecoklatan. Siap untuk dinikmati bersama secangkir teh hangat

Questions arising from beginner steemit

Because I joined steemit, many questions I generate from new members
either directly when gathered with members of steemit or indirectly. From that question then allow me to ask directly in this pistingan. Question as follows: is it a pure steemit platform for social media or business media 100% …?
what percent of the steemian read every post?
How Does Steem Power Affect Reward?
this question often arises from new members, as many new members who generate interesting posts with original images are not getting the appropriate rewards for the award given.

which lets you read posts, whether many I post or I am all affected by the steam power that we have.

There are many things that can be used to support a person, steemit is a free place to be creative and people are free to choose.

The good ash guard.

It controls HDL and LDL in our body mainly.

Asian people are most like this.

I snapped this ash guard by MotoG.

???.

 

Health food

Plenty of Salad

 

Ingredients:

1/2 bunch rocket

1/2 bowl of boiled green lentils

2 branch dill

1/2 avocado

1/2 red radish

1 branch green onion

3 pieces of walnuts

4 pieces of cherry tomatoes

 

Sauce Ingredients

 

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

1/2 lemon juice

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

Preparation:

Slice rocka leaves in medium size and put them in salad bowl. Thinly slice the green grass and green onion into the rock. Then hover over the boiled green cantaloupe leaves. Then slice the radish very thin, cut the lime tomatoes half cut, split the walnuts into quarter pieces, and slice avocados thinly, then place these ingredients on the lemon. Finally, blend the sauce ingredients into a small bowl and hover over the salad, your salad is ready.

 

 

 

Traditional Turkish Food -1

Beyran Soup from Gaziantep

 

Beyran soup recipe is one of the most popular tastes of Gaziantep cuisine. It is quite simple to make a recipe of bean soup which is consumed especially in morning and breakfast in Gaziantep cuisine. Main material is meat and rice

 

Ingredients:

 

1 kg lamb shank

2 teaspoons of brass

5 to 6 cups of water

1 tablespoon butter

2 sweet chili peppers

2 sweet spaghetti red pepper flakes

8 cloves of garlic

SaltBlack pepper

Preparation: The construction of the Beyran soup is very simple :

  1. Boil the cooked meat while preparing the bean soup.
  2. Do not throw meat.
  3. Pick up the meat you are boiling from your bones and dig.
  4. Boil the rice for 15 minutes in another tencered.
  5. Mix the meat you have cooked and the meat you have cooked with rice.
  6. Add the broth.
  7. After rinse the garlic, add some tomato sauce, red pepper, black pepper and salt.
  8. After you have boiled, squeeze lemon over it.
  9. Finally, melt and pour the butter over the bean soup

 

    

 

Chicken Pot Pie Turnover

I’ve had many chicken pot pies but I never had a chicken pot pie turnover. I found this very intriguing. I’ve always had a warm spot for turnovers.

When I lived in Hawaii, there is this chain of fast (local) food restaurants called Zippy’s. Some of these restaurants have a separate kiosk called Napoleon’s. They sold this apple turnover to die for. Ever since then, I’ve had a thing for turnovers.

As I perused today’s news, I came across this recipe for chicken pot pie. To my surprise, they were in a flaky turnover shape. I was hooked. It’s been awhile since I had a turnover or a chicken pot pie.

There was no recipe but it is fairly self explanatory looking at the photos and knowing what a pot pie consists of, so I put together my own recipe. I will not be making it today as I have a pot of split pea soup on already.

For the crust, I will be using filo dough. You can make it but it is hard to get it thin enough. Using store bought dough, you need to let it thaw so it is pliable. Lay a single sheet down and coat it with butter. Add another layer and repeat. You’ll need to make it around 8 or so layers. FYI, the more layers make the result flakier. The butter is important as it keeps the layers from bonding together.

Now for the filling. Start with boiling some chicken, whether you use breasts or thighs is up to you. I don’t recommend wings or legs because the have less meat. Once the chicken is cooked, let cool and pull the meat from the bones. Dice the meat, more or less bite sized. In a pan, add the chicken along with anything you’d like. For me, I would add peas, onions, celery, mushrooms and carrots. Cook the mixture till the vegetables are soft (not mushy). To make the gravy / sauce, I would have fried the chicken before boiling and use the drippings. But you can also make broth from bullion and add flour, corn starch or potato starch. To avoid lumps, take the flour or starch and make a slurry. Take the dry flour / starch and add it to some room temperature water and stir it till it is combined. You don’t need much, a quarter cup of water and about a teaspoon of flour / starch should be fine. Put the broth in a sauce pan and heat. Once hot, drizzle in the slurry and bring to close to boiling. Reduce heat and stir. Soon you’ll see the mixture thicken.

Add the gravy to the vegetables and mix. You should have to cook for long as everything was already hot. Let the mixture cool so it will be easier to make the turnovers. The mixture shouldn’t have to much liquid as this will make the turnover soggy.

Put some of the mixture in the dough and fold the dough into a triangle. Dampen the edges where the dough meets the dough to help it seal. Some like to make an egg wash and use this to seal the edges. If you use egg wash, you can spread the egg wash on the outside of the dough and it will make the outside brown better.

Bake the turnovers in a 350 degree F oven till the dough gets browned. You don’t need to worry about the chicken because it was already cooked.

Can’t wait till tomorrow so I can check this dish out.

Source: nytimes.com

Source: nytimes.com

Source: nytimes.com

Orange / Lemon Chicken

Time for a ‘Do It Yourself’ cooking post.

How about some chicken, my favorite protein.

INGREDIENTS

1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast
2 tsp soy sauce
1 tsp dry sherry
1 tsp corn starch
2 tbsp orange zest
1 tbsp lemon zest
2 tsp sesame oil
3 tbsp cilantro
oil for shallow frying

DIRECTIONS

Cut the chicken into bite sized cubes. Combine the chicken with the soy sauce, sherry and the corn starch. Let marinate for 10 to 15 minutes.

Cook the chicken at a high heat, I would suggest a wok but a fry pan with high sides will work. Cook until the chicken is browned. Add the orange zest, lemon zest and the sesame oil once the chicken has started to brown. Salt and pepper to taste. Add the cilantro as a garnish.

While your marinating the chicken, prepare the rice. I prefer short grain rice but it’s a matter of your tastes. To make rice the ratio is 2 cups of water to 1 cup of rice. For this dish 2 cups of rice should be fine. I wash the rice before cooking. To wash the rice, add water to the rice and hand mix it till the water turns cloudy. Pour out the water and repeat. I usual do this about 3 times, it is to remove the starch coating on the rice.

To cook the rice, I use a rice cooker. If you don’t have one, use a sauce pot with the measured rice and water on high heat. Wait for the water to boil and when the water has boiled off, lower the heat to low and cover the pot. Let it cook on low for about 10 to 15 minutes. Check the rice by trying a few grains to make sure it is not hard in the center. Let rice rest for about 5 minutes before serving.

Source: bbc.com

Pool Hall Food

In your neighborhood pool hall you’d expect the typical food fare. Things like frozen sandwiches, pizza, nachos and other fried foods. Little would you expect a tasty menu of several Vietnamese entrees.

Billiard Hoang has a pleasant surprise in store for you. The top on the list is the lemongrass chicken vermicelli bowl along with some pickled vegetables. Their menu includes noodle soups, rice and meat plates and 16 different banh mi sandwiches. Side dishes include fresh and fried spring rolls, congee, vermicelli bowls and Chinese doughnuts. They also serve unique shakes from avocado and durian. Last but not unexpected, they also serve beer.

To be honest, the pool hall has a small restaurant separate from the pool hall / sports bar. But you can order from the restaurant and have it served in the pool and bar area.

Source: seattletimes.com

Hearty Beef Stew

Growing up in the frigid mid west I recall some of my favorite activities were playing football in the snow for hours and coming home to the aromatic aroma of stew for dinner. When the temps fell there was no better meals than the ones that satisfied the appetite but also warmed the body. All through the winter months we would be fed soup or stew.

I did favor stew over soup as I was a fan of big chunks of beef. I have not grown out of this craving. I found this recipe for a hearty stick to your ribs stew that I’m sure to enjoy.

BURGUNDY BEEF STEW

INGREDIENTS

1 hanger steak brisket or boneless short ribs, 680 grams

1 teaspoon coarse sea salt

1/2 teaspoon fresh-ground white pepper

1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary

1/8 teaspoon dried sage

2 large carrots, cleaned and sliced into rounds

1/2 bulb of garlic, 6-9 individual cloves peeled

6-8 shallots peeled and trimmed

1 package (220 grams) white mushrooms, cleaned and cut in half

1 quart (4 cups) beef broth or stock

2 cups red burgundy (pinot noir)

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

DIRECTIONS

Set whole hanger steak or other meat on a plate. Mix together the salt, pepper, rosemary and sage. If you like a more “seasoned” stew, double the spice mixture and save half of it for seasoning at the end. Season the meat with the spice rub, and place in the pressure cooker or a Dutch Oven.

Pour the sliced carrots, garlic cloves, shallots and mushrooms on top of the meat. Pour the beef broth and wine over the meat and vegetables. Seal your pressure cooker. Set on high pressure for 23 minutes. Once it is cooked, release pressure and keep it warm.

Remove the meat and discard any connective tissue. Cut into chunks and place back into the hot pot and stir. Keep the stew on warm.

In a small skillet over medium heat, melt the butter and add the flour. Let it cook until brown and thickened. Add a little of the cooking liquid, about 1/2 cup total and let it cook until thickened, stirring frequently.

Add thickened sauce to the hot liquid and let simmer uncovered for about 10 minutes. At this point, you can taste the stew and correct any seasonings by adding salt and pepper if needed. You can also season the stew with the spice rub that you seasoned the meat with if you doubled the recipe. Serve the stew at this point, or do as I do and pour the stew into a Dutch oven and let it sit in the refrigerator overnight.

When ready to serve, remove fat cap and simmer for 20 minutes or until hot and bubbling.

A suggestion: I used ground round instead of hangar steak as it is more economical and it is a tenderer cut.

Source: japantoday.com

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